A ‘New Yorker’ Editor Dug For Diversity Stats. She Calls The Results ‘Passive Racism’

“In the last 15 years, less than 0.01% of print features and critical pieces were edited by a Black editor. More women were able to publish profiles in the magazine between 1925 and 1935 than between 1990 and 2000. And over the last 30 years, spanning 1990 to 2020, few to no reviews of cinema, fine arts or classical music were published by either women or writers of color…. written [on Twitter] by a New Yorker insider: Erin Overbey, the magazine's own archive editor.”

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“In the last 15 years, less than 0.01% of print features and critical pieces were edited by a Black editor. More women were able to publish profiles in the magazine between 1925 and 1935 than between 1990 and 2000. And over the last 30 years, spanning 1990 to 2020, few to no reviews of cinema, fine arts or classical music were published by either women or writers of color…. written [on Twitter] by a New Yorker insider: Erin Overbey, the magazine’s own archive editor.”

Forward-thinking CDOs understand that their efforts to enact cross-functional integration of DEI are not always visible to employees. Nor should they be, when we know that real progress takes decades over days.

At the same time, the era of employees staying silent is behind us. Employees can and should hold their employers accountable for not adhering to their DEI goals– full stop. When they do it publicly, however, they tend to trigger a reactionary response from executive suites and boards– leaving CDOs abandoning their long-term, less visible plans for putting out fires. 

At ideascape, we support our clients through both their visible and non-visible actions. We offload your workload, whether it’s responding to public conflict or establishing progressive change. We believe in amplifying your leadership and scaling your impact, resourcing you to stay the course and weather distractions. Talk to Deon Gaines or Jonathan Dyke to learn more.

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Boards Need Real Diversity, Not Tokenism

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